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Thinking COMPLICATED


The Noble Savage in 19th Century Imagination. Detail of Madre Filipinas in ‘supplication stance’, in Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo’s study of Per Pacem Et Libertatem

“…As the century progressed, native peoples and their traditions increasingly became a foil serving to highlight the accomplishments of Europe and the expansion of the European Imperial powers, who justified their policies on the basis of a presumed racial and cultural superiority.”


As defined by Brewer’s, the noble savage is the idealized human prototype, inherently good in a state of nature before being corrupted by ‘civilization’.

“During the 19th century the idea that men were everywhere and always the same that had characterized both classical antiquity and the Enlightenment was exchanged for a more organic and dynamic evolutionary concept of human history. Advances in technology now made the indigenous man and his simpler way of life appear, not only inferior, but also, even his defenders agreed, foredoomed by the inexorable advance of progress to inevitable extinction. The sentimentalized “primitive” ceased to figure as a moral reproach to the decadence of the effete European, as in previous centuries. Instead, the argument shifted to a discussion of whether his demise should be considered a desirable or regrettable eventuality. As the century progressed, native peoples and their traditions increasingly became a foil serving to highlight the accomplishments of Europe and the expansion of the European Imperial powers, who justified their policies on the basis of a presumed racial and cultural superiority.” Source


COMPLICATED is the first offering of Lopez Museum & Library for 2014. Exhibition run: 21 February – 02 August 2014

To RSVP for the Opening and Artists’ Reception

This exhibition situates the post-colonial critiques presented by the oeuvre of guest visual artists, Leslie de Chavez and Mike Adrao, along with dancer/choreographer Ea Torrado, the many upheavals of Philippine history represented in the archival, library, and art collections of the Lopez Memorial Museum and Library. Focusing on the complicated relationship of the Philippines with its colonial pasts, the exhibit will problematize the notion that identity is both a product of our post-colonial circumstance and the discourse of nationhood.

The Lopez Memorial Museum and Library is at the ground floor, Benpres Building, Exchange Road corner Meralco Avenue, Pasig City. Museum days and hours are Mondays to Saturdays, except holidays,8am-5pm. For more information, call Tina at 631-2417 or email lmmpasig@gmail.com

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